Sugar Rush: Review

Sugar Rush: Review

In the past, I have never been super attracted to pastry and sweets books. But now that I am in culinary school and considering going into the Baking & Pastry side of the program, I figured it would be a good time to check one out, and this one looked very good from the preview. That, and I am in love with the fact that it actually teaches people how to COOK the food and not just gives them a recipe for it. It shows them how to make it, and why they do the things they do – and for a successful recipe, with something as temperamental as most desserts – that is so, so important. If you don’t understand why you are doing a certain step, what’s to stop you from trying to skip it to save time? First Impressions Okay, this is a huge book. And it’s such a solid book, which as a collector I like, but also as someone who COOKS from the books, I like. I want a book which will resist some water and which will not start to crack around the binding if I keep it open for too long. It also has very high-quality pages, which I adore for the same reasons as above. But I also adore them because they are gorgeous! This whole book is beautiful. Everything from the glossy dessert sauces, to the creams, to the piped meringues makes me want to make it. I just want to go over to Johnny Iuzzini’s house and eat everything that comes out of his kitchen. The Recipes I think...
#MadeWithChobani Chicken Tikka Masala and Mango Lassi

#MadeWithChobani Chicken Tikka Masala and Mango Lassi

Probably my favorite kind of restaurant food is Indian food. I love curry and naan bread and mint chutney. It’s just a little too expensive for weekly feasting, so I had to learn to make my own. I was inspired by Chobani’s #MadeWithChobani Project to create a recipe, and I knew exactly what I was planning to do – Indian food! It’s the perfect way to use yogurt, and it also gives me an excuse to make an entire Indian feast. And I am not one to turn down the chance to create an entire feast. Or eat one. Chicken Tikka Masala is in my top two favorite curries (the other is vegetable korma). And Tandoori Chicken is delicious (yes, even if you’re me and you make it in the oven instead of a Tandoor). This is the only picture I got of the chicken, somehow. I was hungry, man. We’re lucky I got any pictures at all! But as good as the curry is, lassis are totally the best. Totally. Even in the middle of December when it’s freezing rain and I haven’t seen sandals in three months. Because they’re refreshing, but they’re also filling. Really, you could eat them as a breakfast shake, sometimes I do. Here’s the printable recipe card! I added both recipes to it so you can just print one page for the entire thing! Chicken Tikka Masala and Mango Lassi Recipe Type: Dinner Cuisine: Indian Author: Sam (Sizzling Mess) Ingredients Tandoori Chicken 2-3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon fresh grated ginger (I like to buy the kind which comes in...
Steak Fajita Nachos

Steak Fajita Nachos

I had my wisdom teeth removed last Monday. Complete bony impaction. On Sunday I developed mild dry socket. Today is Monday (again!). I can’t eat super solid food, or especially crunchy food, so I think it’s a good day to make a post about nachos which I ESPECIALLY cannot eat. We have a local Mexican restaurant “chain” here (if three restaurants counts as a chain). I went there one time on the way home from a horse show as a kid and had their fajita nachos. These nachos stuck with me for YEARS. Until one day I went back as an adult, and, by some grace of god, found the same dish and ordered it. And somehow it was still exactly the same as before. Ooey, gooey, goodness. I also went back last Saturday before my tooth extraction so I could have a last crunchy meal before weeks of no chips. And then I followed it with huge margaritas, which I also cannot have. But, it’s not super cheap at that place, and I eat out way too much, so I needed to learn to make this one at home. And mine is maybe a bit better, if I do say so myself! First is learning to make cheese sauce at home. Here’s a spoiler: That white cheese sauce at Mexican restaurants? It’s not some fancy Central-American cheese. It’s white American. I use Swiss flavored American. It’s all whatever. And then is learning to blacken the crap out of some vegetables. Never done that before. But it’s easy. Just have some steel wool ready for your pan and DO...
Moosewood Cookbook (40th Anniversary Edition): Review

Moosewood Cookbook (40th Anniversary Edition): Review

If you did not know (which, why would you?), I was a vegetarian for many years. And I was raised in a house that didn’t really eat that much meat anyway. So the Moosewood books were a staple. Vegetarian recipes that don’t feel “vegetarian”. I love cookbooks, I have an ever-growing collection of them – but it never even occurred to me to buy any of the original Moosewood cookbooks for a couple of reasons: First, my grandma has them and I can borrow hers. And second, they’re really hefty paperbacks and I have limited apartment space. First Impressions I was VERY pleased to see a heavy-duty and durable hardback. I love paperback books to read, but they don’t stand up to constant use in the kitchen (and I promise I will be using this one a lot). It was also much thinner than I am used to seeing with Moosewood cookbooks, so my overcrowded bookshelf was pleased with that. I feel like this book was a part of my childhood, and when I opened the anniversary edition I was not quite sure what to expect. It was thinner, and newer, and I was wondering if it had maybe been updated for modern times “Joy of Cooking style”. So, I don’t have an original to compare it to – but from what I can see (and from what the author included in her note) it has been tweaked for modern tastes in some parts, and “about 25 new recipes” have been added! Sounds good to me! Not to mention: They still have the original introduction from 1977, and a history of the...
The Skinnytaste Cookbook: Review

The Skinnytaste Cookbook: Review

When I saw this cookbook, I immediately put it on my “want to own” list. I hate to admit I was wholly unfamiliar with the blogger, but I was drawn in by the photography and the fact that I agree with her philosophies. A cookbook that is low calorie, but not necessarily low fat. Another person who does not believe in artificial sweeteners and low fat dairy and who just thinks you should use the good stuff in moderation. Who thinks that eating real food and being healthy is better than being skinny (even if being skinny is nice, too). First Impressions The photography is stunning, and the food looks like something I would order in a restaurant. Not something that is “low calorie”. Huge plus there. Personally I love books which are written “blog style”. As in, lots of high quality photos, a little story that goes with each recipe, and super easy-to-follow directions. That’s not to say I don’t appreciate more professional-level books. But for every day use, these are the books I am drawn to. They are also the books that I recommend to friends. Not my culinary school friends, but my regular ones. The ones who would scoff at Keller’s The French Laundry and vow never to cook again. This is a book for an average person, who works full time, who maybe has kids, and who only has an hour to make dinner. This book is realistic. The Recipes So, I love the philosophy behind these recipes. These are recipes I would make (I AM going to make), they are my idea of healthy...